Proposed Great Lake Adventure Trail

Heard about the proposed Great Lake Adventure Trail and want to know about Hydro Tasmania's role in the project?

The trail is being proposed by Great Lake Adventure Trail Pty Ltd. As a majority land-owner, Hydro Tasmania must assess the potential impacts of the trail on the area's social, environmental and heritage values, as well as our own operations. Read below for an overview of the assessment process - and make sure you subscribe to receive project updates.

What is proposed?

The proposed Great Lake Adventure Trail is a multi-day walking and cycling track. If approved, the trail will circumnavigate yingina/Great Lake in Tasmania's remote central highlands.

What is Hydro Tasmania's role?

Many Tasmanians use our land and waterways to support their businesses and recreational activities, from bee keeping and rowing to festivals and irrigation. All prospective third-party users must apply for a licence - and before one can be granted - we must assess the proposed activities to make sure they don't have lasting or significant impacts on communities, the environment or our operations.

We were initially provided with a high-level overview of the proposed Great Lake Adventure trail in mid-2020. We've subsequently met with the proponent and their representatives to explain our assessment process, the type of information we would require and highlight the key issues and risks that we think require targeted consideration.

In this instance, we will be undertaking the assessment on behalf of Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) who also own land around yingina/Great Lake and following their environmental impact assessment process.

The level of Reserve Activity Assessment (RAA) that will be required is yet to be finalised. Given the scale of the proposed trail, we'd anticipate a Level 3/4 RAA may be required which would take 9 - 18 months.


Will the community get a chance to be involved?

Understanding the community's views is very important to us and your feedback will be integral to our assessment process. Ask us a question or give us a call at any time. Once the assessment process starts, we'll also offer a range of opportunities for you to share your thoughts with us, both in person, online (via this page) or over the phone.

Heard about the proposed Great Lake Adventure Trail and want to know about Hydro Tasmania's role in the project?

The trail is being proposed by Great Lake Adventure Trail Pty Ltd. As a majority land-owner, Hydro Tasmania must assess the potential impacts of the trail on the area's social, environmental and heritage values, as well as our own operations. Read below for an overview of the assessment process - and make sure you subscribe to receive project updates.

What is proposed?

The proposed Great Lake Adventure Trail is a multi-day walking and cycling track. If approved, the trail will circumnavigate yingina/Great Lake in Tasmania's remote central highlands.

What is Hydro Tasmania's role?

Many Tasmanians use our land and waterways to support their businesses and recreational activities, from bee keeping and rowing to festivals and irrigation. All prospective third-party users must apply for a licence - and before one can be granted - we must assess the proposed activities to make sure they don't have lasting or significant impacts on communities, the environment or our operations.

We were initially provided with a high-level overview of the proposed Great Lake Adventure trail in mid-2020. We've subsequently met with the proponent and their representatives to explain our assessment process, the type of information we would require and highlight the key issues and risks that we think require targeted consideration.

In this instance, we will be undertaking the assessment on behalf of Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) who also own land around yingina/Great Lake and following their environmental impact assessment process.

The level of Reserve Activity Assessment (RAA) that will be required is yet to be finalised. Given the scale of the proposed trail, we'd anticipate a Level 3/4 RAA may be required which would take 9 - 18 months.


Will the community get a chance to be involved?

Understanding the community's views is very important to us and your feedback will be integral to our assessment process. Ask us a question or give us a call at any time. Once the assessment process starts, we'll also offer a range of opportunities for you to share your thoughts with us, both in person, online (via this page) or over the phone.

We're here to answer your questions

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  • It is suggested that the proposed trail will be constructed below the current splash line , if this is the case why did shack owners have to relocate their shacks some forty years ago? Will the shack owners be receiving compensation for relocating when quite possibly it wasn’t necessary in the first place.

    Shayne asked about 2 months ago

    Hi Shayne,

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts and questions.

    Our land and waterways are a shared Tasmanian asset and as managers, our role is to consider the needs of all users and where possible, deliver balanced benefits. Every request we receive to use our land or waterways is assessed objectively and equitably- our assessment process considers potential social impacts, such as disruptions to surrounding residents.

    In the 1990s, the State Government gave shack owners in the Central Highlands the opportunity to convert long-term leases to ownerships. As part of that process, some shacks were relocated to prevent damage by wave action and protect owners' properties.

    A final route design for the proposed Great Lake Adventure Trail will be subject to a detailed assessment of potential risks and issues. Similar to all our lakes, new infrastructure should remain outside the Full Supply Level (high water level) to protect those assets.

    Cheers

    Jane

  • There are too many rules and regulations up here now at the Great Lake, I understand the process the Hydro will use to make a decision but please be well informed of the populations in Derby, Scottsdale, George Town, Maydena, Sheffield, and other regions who are now having to change their life style to allow for a floating population of cyclists who take up resources that are already stretched to the limit. Graffiti, vandalism, rubbish and road hazards will become a major problem. Working in the area I notice the owners of bikes park where they can see their valued possession, and that is always in an area where lake views are or leaning on windows or footpaths , around door ways. etc. An owner of a $ 50,000 or 60,000 dollar 4wd is happy to park outside their accommodation room but a cyclist needs a lock up garage or to take the bike into a room. My question is where will the riders sleep , wash and eat , park and gather to fit in with existing community values?

    Cossie asked about 2 months ago

    Hi Cossie,

    We understand that new ventures can change communities – both positively and negatively. That's why we carefully consider the potential social impacts of all third-party uses of our land and waterways through our assessment process.

    With respect to the proposed Great Lake Adventure Trail, the proponent will be required to provide information on operational aspects such as accommodation and parking, and these details will inform our social impact assessment.

    Cheers

    Jane

  • Why would hydro consider this proposal? Why not build the trail where it won’t interfere with shack owners?

    Shayne asked about 2 months ago

    Hi Shayne,

    I've answered this question below.

    Cheers

    Jane

  • Will there be rules and regulations imposed on the lake e.g.. parking, speed limits , access , no entry areas?

    Cossie asked about 2 months ago

    Hi Cossie and thanks for your question. 

    As part of our assessment process, the proponent must outline how the proposed trail would be managed, including aspects such as parking and access arrangements. We will use this information to inform our thinking on potential social, economic and environmental impacts.

    Cheers

    Jane

  • Not a question, but a message of support for the proposed bike trail around Great Lake. Not only will it boost the number of visitors to the region we love, boost the local economy, but it's incredibly democratic. Anybody can buy a 'dunger' bike from their tip shop and enjoy it.

    Kingfisher asked about 2 months ago

    Hi Kingfisher,

    Thanks for visiting this project site and sharing your views with us. 

    Community feedback is an integral part of our assessment process and we will consider contributions from all stakeholders, including views shared via this project site.  

    Cheers

    Jane

  • I don't have a question .but I would like to make it known that I and the users of my shack are totally 100 percent opposed to the bike track development .

    asked about 2 months ago

    Hello and thanks for visiting this project site and sharing your views with us. 

    Community feedback is an integral part of our assessment process and we will consider contributions from all stakeholders, including views shared via this project site.  

    Cheers

    Jane

  • I find it hard to understand why Hydro Tasmania would even contemplate allowing a trail to be built around such an important water storage facility. Whilst the "Great Lake" has been under 50% capacity for quite a few years why permit any use that would even slightly complicate further development of this iconic water storage facility. Can you please explain how Hydro Tasmania's management could possibly see how this would be in Hydro's future economics interest or the people of Tasmania's interest. Have nothing against a bike and walking trail provided it is located appropriately. Thanks in anticipation of your reply. Regards Ken Last

    Ken lasr asked 2 months ago

    Hi Ken, 

    Thanks for sharing your views with us. Our land and waterways are a community asset for the shared benefit of all Tasmanians. While our priority is generating green, renewable energy, we look to support other community uses where possible, including recreation and business opportunities. Prior to allowing any third-party use, we assess its potential impacts as well as its benefits. This is the process we will be following for the proposed Great Lake Adventure Trail.

    Among the many potential impacts we consider are operational impacts. The water level in Great Lake takes a range of factors into consideration including maximising energy generation, protecting resident populations of threatened galaxiids and balancing the needs of multiple users across the broader south-esk scheme. The ideal water level for Great Lake is well below Full Supply Level due to efficiency gains at Poatina Power Station and we regularly engage with our diverse group of stakeholder to ensure we’re understanding, and where possible, meeting their needs. 

    Community feedback is also an integral part of our assessment of third-party uses, such as this proposed Great Lake Adventure Trail, and we will consider contributions from all stakeholders, including views shared via this project site.  


    Cheers
    Jane

  • What will happen to the privacy of the shack owners and people who enjoy camping on the shores of the great lake when we have mountain bikers etc and no doubt trail bike riders who will use the track regardless if they are allowed or not. Invading our privacy? Why does this area need development its needs to be left alone.

    Kurtis Youd asked about 2 months ago

    Hi Kurtis, 

    Thanks  for sharing your views with us. Our land and waterways are a community asset for the shared benefit of all Tasmanians. While our priority is generating green renewable energy, we look to support other community uses where possible, including recreation and business opportunities. Prior to allowing any third-party use, we assess its potential impacts as well as its benefits. This is the process we will be following for the proposed Great Lake Adventure Trail.

    Community feedback is an integral part of our assessment process and in order to be equitable we will consider contributions from all stakeholders, including views shared via this project site.  

    Cheers

    Jane